Daddle-i-Day

 

                              

 

The first Private Derby was acquired in 1858 by the 95th (Derbyshire) Regiment of Foot at the Seige and capture of Kotah during the Indian Mutiny Campaign of 1857 – 1858. The Commanding Officer whilst on one of his forays within the town, noticed a fine fighting ram tethered in a temple yard. He directed Private Sullivan of the Number 1 Company to take the ram into his possession. We are not told what were the intentions of the Commanding Officer in taking the ram, but if it was with the anticipation of a sound mutton dinner, then he must have gone hungry, for the Ram was not slaughtered.

The Ram followed Private Sullivan quite contentedly and marched some 3,000 miles throughout Central India with the Regiment. He was present with the 95th during their engagements in six actions, as a result of which, in 1862 he received with the remainder of the Battalion on parade at Poona the "India Medal with Clasp Central India". This medal is one of the items to be found on display in the Regimental Museum Gallery in Nottingham Castle.

It is on record that Private Derby 1st fought in thirty three battles with other Rams and was never defeated. Unfortunately, he came to a sad end when he jumped over the wall of a well at Hyderabad Sind in 1863 and was drowned.

Since that time there has followed a succession of fine rams, each of which has inherited the official title of "PRIVATE DERBY" followed by his successive number. The earliest replacement Rams were presented to the Regiment in which ever part of the world they were serving in at the time. however, since 1912 it has become the tradition for the Duke of Devonshire to select a Swaledale Ram from his Chatsworth Park flock and present it to the Regiment. It is a tradition the Duke is proud to hold, in recognition of the close association between the Regiment and the Dukes of Devonshire

"THE BALLAD OF THE DERBY RAM"

The following is the history of the words and origin of the tune "The Derby Ram" as discovered to date. The origin of this popular old ballad has yet to be ascertained says Jewitt in his Ballads and Songs of Derbyshire in 1867. It was at least 100 years old at the time of Jewitt setting down his writings. There is an earlier reference to the tune ia letter from the Rev Henry Cantrell, Vicar of St Alkmunds in 1739. Thomas Moult in his Derbyshire Prose and Verse of 1929 ascribes the words to the sixteenth century, with the author being unknown. The Ballad was set to music by either Dr John Wall Callcott, a Londoner (1776-1821) or his son William Hutchings Callcott (1807-1882)

As I was going to Derby, Sir, All on a market day, I met the finest Ram, Sir That was ever fed on hay.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

The Ram was fat behind, Sir This Ram was fat before, This Ram was ten yards high, Sir Indeed he was no more.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

The wool upon his back, Sir Reached up into the sky, The eagles made their nests there, Sir For I heard the young ones cry.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

The wool upon his belly, Sir It dragged upon the ground. It was sold in Derby Town, Sir, For four thousand pound.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

The space between his horns, Sir Was as far as man could reach, And there they built a pulpit, Sir for the Parson there to preach.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

The teeth that were in his mouth, Sir, Were like a Regiment of men, And the tongue that hung between them, Sir, Would have dined them twice and again.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

The Ram jumped o’er a wall, Sir, His tail caught on a briar, It reached from Derby Town, Sir, All into Leicestershire.

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

"And of this tail so long, Sir, Twas ten yards and an ell", They made a goodly rope, Sir, to toll the market bell

Daddle-i-Day, Daddle-i-Hay, Fal-de-Ral, Fal-de-Ral, Daddle-i-Hay

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