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Indian labourers work in a field of Jatropha in the village of Hassan, some 250 kms from Bangalore. Jatropha, a wild shrub that grows abundantly across India, has been hailed as an eco-friendly solution to the energy needs. (AFP Photo / Mission Biofuels India)

Indian labourers work in a field of Jatropha in the village of Hassan, some 250 kms from Bangalore. Jatropha, a wild shrub that grows abundantly across India, has been hailed as an eco-friendly solution to the energy needs. (AFP Photo / Mission Biofuels India)

2 million kilometers of foreign purchased land in developing countries is either idle or used for Western biofuel production, according to a British charity. Oxfam’s report estimates an area the size of London is sold every six days.

The report states that between 2000 and 2010, 60% of investment in agricultural land by foreign traders occurred in developing countries with hunger problems.

Yet two thirds of those investors plan to export everything they produce. While 60% of deals are to produce crops that can be used for biofuels. Land can also be left idle, as speculators wait for its value to increase.

Oxfam estimates that this…

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  1. And we thought bio-fuels were such a good idea at first, didn’t we? As I see the problem today, the world can’t have it all. Unless we think of something we haven’t tried yet, we can’t simultaneously 1) use all the energy we want to support or develop our middle-class life styles, 2) provide enough food for the world not to starve, and 3) protect the environment sufficiently so that we humans can continue to live here.

    My hope is that our creativity is greater than our greed, that our ingenuity is greater than our short-sightedness, and that we don’t try to solve our problems by denying that they exist at all. Or that God will take care of it, so we don’t have to.

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